Joe Duffy's Blog

  • June 1, 2011
  • An interview with InfoQ
  • InfoQ recently asked me a few questions about concurrency and programming languages, and here is what I had to say:

  • December 4, 2010
  • Sayonara volatile
  • After spending more time than I’d like to admit over the years researching memory model literature (particularly Java’s terrific JMM and related publications), subsequently trying to “fix” the CLR memory model, reviewing proposals for new C++ memory models, and beating my head against the wall for months developing a new memory model that supports weakly ordered processors like the kind you’ll find on ARM in a developer-friendly yet power-efficient way, I have a conclusion to share.

  • October 31, 2010
  • Dense, and pointer-free
  • I rambled on and on a few weeks back about how much performance matters. Although I got a lot of contrary feedback, most of it had to do with my deliberately controversial title than the content of the article. I had intended to post a redux, but something more concise is on my mind lately.

  • September 6, 2010
  • The 'premature optimization is evil' myth
  • I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard the age-old adage echoed inappropriately and out of context:

  • July 11, 2010
  • Thoughts on immutability and concurrency
  • That immutability facilitates increased degrees of concurrency is an oft-cited dictum. But is it true? And either way, why?

  • July 1, 2010
  • When is a readonly field not readonly?
  • In .NET today, readonly/initonly-ness is in the eye of the provider. Not the beholder.

  • June 27, 2010
  • On partially-constructed objects
  • Partially-constructed objects are a constant source of difficulty in object-oriented systems. These are objects whose construction has not completed in its entirety prior to another piece of code trying to use them. Such uses are often error-prone, because the object in question is likely not in a consistent state. Because this situation is comparatively rare in the wild, however, most people (safely) ignore or remain ignorant of the problem. Until one day they get bitten.

  • May 16, 2010
  • More thoughts on transactional memory
  • My article about Transactional Memory (TM) was picked up by a few news feeds recently.

  • April 25, 2010
  • From Simple Annotations for Analysis to Effect Typing
  • We use static analysis very heavily in my project here at Microsoft, as a way of finding bugs and/or enforcing policies that would have otherwise gone unenforced. Many of the analyses we rely on are in fact minor extensions to the CLR type system, and verge on “effect typing”, an intriguing branch of type systems research that has matured significantly over the years.

  • February 28, 2010
  • On (Haskell) Type Classes and (C#) Interfaces
  • Simon Peyton Jones was in town a couple weeks back to deliver a repeat of his ECOOP’09 keynote, “Classes, Jim, but not as we know them. Type classes in Haskell: what, why, and whither”, to a group of internal Microsoft language folks. It was a fantastic talk, and pulled together multiple strains of thought that I’ve been pondering lately, most notably the common thread amongst them: interfface abstraction.